Parents as Teachers celebrates its 35th anniversary with year-long community engagement events

Festivities start with CEO throwing out the first pitch at Cardinals game; Conclude with Jubilee honoring the group's founder at 2019 Conference

 

Parents as Teachers 35th Anniversary logo

ST. LOUIS, MO – March 12, 2019 – Parents as Teachers, headquartered here and specializing in early childhood home visiting support to tens of thousands of families, is celebrating its 35th anniversary with a renewed commitment to community engagement.

Founded in Missouri in 1984, Parents as Teachers will commemorate the milestone with year-long events across its national network of 1,036 affiliate partners under the theme: 35 Years - Investing in Families, Impacting Communities.

“We plan to celebrate this important juncture in our organization’s history by giving our affiliates multiple opportunities to get involved in local projects where they could make a difference in their communities,” said Constance Gully, Parents as Teachers president and chief executive officer.

In addition to several planned events, Parents as Teachers offices are collecting stories from individuals about how the organization has impacted their lives. The stories will be cataloged in an audio format called StoryCorps® Archive Community and shared over social media platforms and preserved for future generations.

“We’re going to be leveraging the unique abilities and enthusiasm of our talented staff and affiliate partners to collect some stories that remind us of our shared humanity and to strengthen and build deeper connections between Parents as Teachers and the families we serve,” said Gully.

Other activities include: Parents as Teachers Day at Busch Stadium in April, where Gully will throw out the first pitch at the Cardinals vs Padres baseball game; a Professional Women’s Engagement Café in May, Professional Men’s Engagement Event for Fathers and National Roll and Read Day in June, National Day of Service in September, and the 2019 International Conference at the Hyatt Regency at the Arch hotel in October. The festivities will culminate with a 35th Anniversary Jubilee on the grounds and museum of the newly renovated St. Louis Arch.  Parents as Teachers Founder Mildred Winter and other luminaries will be lauded there.

Parent educators and staff at the Parents as Teachers National Center in St. Louis, MO pose with Parents as Teachers Founder Mildred Winter (seated center) and Constance Gully, the organization’s president and CEO, (left) during Winter’s 98th birthday celebration. The day was also recognized as National Parents as Teachers Day and the kick-off to Parents as Teachers 35th-anniversary activities.

Parent educators and staff at the Parents as Teachers National Center in St. Louis, MO pose with Parents as Teachers Founder Mildred Winter (seated center) and Constance Gully, the organization’s president and CEO, (left) during Winter’s 98th birthday celebration. The day was also recognized as National Parents as Teachers Day and the kick-off to Parents as Teachers 35th-anniversary activities.

“This anniversary year gives us a platform to share our myriad accomplishments, and provides us with an exceptional opportunity to recognize the hard work of our affiliates, and thank our state leaders, supporters, board members and legislators for their dedication in helping us achieve three and a half decades of success," Gully said.

‘Missouri’s greatest export’ also reaches a milestone

Regarding the STL Life article “A Toast to The Town” (March 3):

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch did a wonderful job lifting up organizations and businesses that are celebrating milestones this year. One more group for the list is Parents as Teachers, an international nonprofit headquartered in St. Louis that is celebrating its 35th anniversary.

Parents as Teachers promotes early development, learning and health of children by supporting and engaging parents and caregivers. It builds strong communities, thriving families and children who are healthy, safe and ready to learn by matching parents and caregivers with services for pregnant women and families with children from birth through kindergarten, many of whom live in the most challenged communities.

In 1984, then-Missouri Gov. Christopher “Kit” Bond, a father of a newborn, supported legislation to require Parents as Teachers in every state school district. He knew that babies don’t come with instructions and that parenting is hard. Having started here in Missouri, this group is now in all 50 states, 115 tribal communities and six other countries. To this day, as a lifetime board member, Bond never fails to claim the group as Missouri’s greatest export.

Parents as Teachers’ early childhood home visiting model is backed by 35 years of research with proven outcomes for children and families. Last year, the group served close to 200,000 families in 8,221 ZIP codes.

Constance Gully • Maryland Heights

‘Parents Are Children's First, Best Teachers’: How Home-Visiting Model ‘Adds Value’ To Development

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Parents as Teacher CEO Constance Gully shared her experience with the organization and it's efforts to promote optimal early development in children by educating and engaging parents and guardians.   Credit Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Parents as Teacher CEO Constance Gully shared her experience with the organization and it's efforts to promote optimal early development in children by educating and engaging parents and guardians.

Credit Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

By LARA HAMDAN  FEB 13, 2019

Constance Gully’s first encounter with the home-visiting Parents as Teachers (PaT) program was 24 years ago, when she became pregnant and experienced complications and preterm labor.

“I was afraid,” Gully explained to host Don Marsh on Wednesday. “Every parent wants what's best for their child; and regardless of their economic or educational status, every parent can be a great parent, but we don't always have the confidence to know that.

Parents as Teachers is great to provide parents with the affirmation to just let them know you can take these particular steps to help add value to your child's development and let parents know that they play a role.”

Fast forward to the present day, Gully is now the CEO of the organization. She joined Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air to talk about the organization’s efforts to promote optimal early development in children by educating and engaging parents and guardians.

“[When] we buy a car, you get an owner's manual that tells you when to get it serviced. When we have a baby, we don't get any instructions,” she said. PaT focuses on families in the prenatal stage through kindergarten.

“Parents are their children's first and best teachers. So because 80 percent of rapid brain development occurs before the age of three, there are lots of things that a parent can do to engage and advance their child's development,” Gully added.

The national organization, which began and is headquartered in St. Louis, uses an approach that incorporates home visits by “parent educators,” health/developmental screenings, support groups and connections to community resources. It is currently celebrating its 35th anniversary through a series of community-engagement projects.

PaT works in various communities including: urban, rural, Native American reservations and overseas in the United Kingdom, Canada and Germany. They collaborate with local organizations, schools districts and faith-based organizations that implement home-visiting models to help expand opportunities for parents.

NEW DATA SHOWS PARENTS AS TEACHERS PRODUCES POSITIVE RESULTS

NEW DATA ILLUSTRATE THAT PARENTS AS TEACHERS EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAM PRODUCES POSITIVE RESULTS FOR CHILDREN AND PARENTS IN SCHOOL AND AT HOME

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New research has found that children who participated in Parents as Teachers Sunnyside Unified School District’s home visitation program performed significantly better over time on English, reading and math assessments, while their parents demonstrated improved parenting quality. Parents as Teachers home visiting program in the District serves more than 300 families in Pima County, Arizona.

Click above to enlarge infographic, or click here to download PDF

The peer-reviewed research study, Parents as Teachers home visiting intervention: A path to improved academic outcomes, school behavior, and parenting skills, was conducted by LeCroy & Milligan Associates, Inc., a research and evaluation firm in Tucson, AZ. It found statistically significant findings for the 625-983 children in grades 3-12 who participated in the Sunnyside Unified School District PAT program.

The results revealed that the students:

  • Performed significantly better on Arizona’s English Language Arts assessment.

  • Performed significantly better on phonics and reading comprehension tests.

  • Demonstrated a significantly larger gain in Arizona’s math assessment.

  • Had significantly lower average absence rates (for four school years).

  • Had significantly higher average scores in Arizona reading and writing assessments among English learners.

  • Showed fewer in-school suspension days (for one school year).

For the more than 300 participating parents, the study showed that they:

  • Demonstrated significantly improved parenting quality while in the program.

  • Showed significant improvements in Protective Factors which are: Family functioning; social support; and concrete support.

Allison Kemner, VP of research and quality at the National Center, said, “Because the study shows that children and their families succeed on numerous indicators – well beyond the early grades – we are confident that our evidence-based model generates significant impact for families.”

Sunnyside PAT Director Joan Katz said, “This means that when we meet families where they are and provide sustainable parenting tools, families with young children are more likely to succeed. It’s an amazing program we provide and now we know it’s working for Tucson families.”

Parson’s budget would help 1,529 Missouri families with early childhood development services

JANUARY 24, 2019 BY ALISA NELSON

Missouri Capitol Rotunda (Photo courtesy of Tim Bommel, House Communications)

Missouri Capitol Rotunda (Photo courtesy of Tim Bommel, House Communications)

Gov. Mike Parson is proposing a $3 million funding increase next fiscal year to provide early childhood development services to 1,529 Missouri families. The recommended FY2020 funding would help families with children from birth to three years old who are considered in “high need” of help. High need families could be those without a home or living in poverty, teen or single parents, academic, international or military families, incarcerated parents, households with substance misuse, children or parents with a medical condition, and the list goes on and on.

Parents as Teachers Awards Blue Ribbon to 87 Affiliates

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Parents as Teachers National Center is thrilled to award 87 affiliates the Blue Ribbon designation! These affiliates met all of the Essential Requirements, along with at least 75% of the Quality Standards through completion of the Quality Endorsement and Improvement Process. The commitment these affiliates demonstrate to providing high quality services to families is inspiring and impactful. Congratulations to all of the awardees!   

Awarded 2018

  • Kids' Corp Inc. (AK)

  • Family Guidance Center of Alabama First Teacher Home Visiting Program (AL)

  • PACT Parents and Children Together (AL)

  • Marana Unified School District/MUSD Parents As Teachers Program (AZ)

  • Arizona Partnership for Children Parents as Teachers (AZ)

  • Tuba City Boarding School BabyFACE Program (AZ)

  • Casa De Los Niños Inc. (AZ)

  • Easterseals Blake Foundation-Southeast Arizona (AZ)

  • CPLC Parenting Arizona (AZ)

  • Boulder County Parents as Teachers (CO)

  • Berthoud & Fort Collins PAT-The Family Center/ La Familia (CO)

  • Family Development Center Newborn Network PAT (CO)

  • Focus Points Family Resource Center – PAT (CO)

  • Fox Run School Family Resource Center Parents as Teachers/Norwalk Public Schools (CT)

  • East Shore District Health Department (CT)

  • Hartford Nurturing Families Network (CT)

  • Parents as Teachers of Catoosa County (GA)

  • Butts County Family Enrichment Center (GA)

  • Prevent Child Abuse Pickens (GA)

  • Families First (GA)

  • Building Healthy Families - PAT/Child Abuse Prevention Services (IA)

  • First Taste Program/ISBE Early Childhood Block Grant (IL)

  • Todd Early Childhood Center/West Aurora School District 129 (IL)

  • North Greene Unit District #3 Bright Futures PAT (IL)

  • Triad Foundation for Success - PAT (IL)

  • Unity Point Family Circle Parents as Teachers (IL)

  • Riley Early Childhood Center-P.A.T./Harvey School District 152 (IL)

  • Jump Start, Easter Seals Joliet Region (IL)

  • Bureau Henry Stark Regional Office of Education (IL)

  • Madison County Unit School District #12/ Parents as Teachers (IL)

  • Smart Talk Parental Support Program/West Harvey-Dixmoor School District #147 (IL)

  • ECHO Family Enrichment Program (IL)

  • Transitions of Western Illinois Parents as Teachers (IL)

  • Jersey CUSD #100 Growing Together (IL)

  • Roseland-Atlgeld Adolescent Parent Program/Catholic Charities of the Archdioceses of Chicago (IL)

  • Family Focus Nuestra Familia (IL)

  • Parents as Teachers First Years (IL)

  • ROE #3 Learning Express Parents as Teachers (IL)

  • District 41 Baby & Me Prevention Initiative (IL)

  • Project CARES Prevention Initiative/Wabash Community School District 348 (IL)

  • Macon Resources, Inc./Bright Start (IL)

  • Abilities Plus/TIPS Program (IL)

  • True to Life Foundation/Chicago Public Schools (IL)

  • Topeka Public Schools Parents as Teachers (KS)

  • Marion County Parents as Teachers (KS)

  • Branch Intermediate School District (MI)

  • Malden R-1 School District Consolidation (MO)

  • Imprints Cares (NC)

  • Hoke County Parents as Teachers (NC)

  • Partnership for Children of Wayne County (NC)

  • Rockingham County Partnership for Children (NC)

  • Somerset County Parents as Teachers (NJ)

  • Bethany Public Schools Parents as Teachers (OK)

  • Oklahoma City Public Schools Parents as Teachers Program (OK)

  • Lancaster Family Center-P.A.T./Community Action Program of Lancaster County (PA)

  • Salisbury Area Family Center - PAT/Salisbury- Elk Lick School District (PA)

  • Coatesville Family Resource Center PAT/Community, Youth & Women's Alliance (CYWA) (PA)

  • Infant Development Program (PA)

  • Community Services of Venango County/PAT (PA)

  • Westerly Public Schools MIECHV PAT (RI)

  • Connecting for Children and Families (RI)

  • Newberry Family Literacy Program (SC)

  • Children and Parents Sharing - C.A.P.S./Bamberg School District One (SC)

  • Florence School District One/Family Literacy Program (SC)

  • Marlboro County School District- Parents as Teachers (SC)

  • Starfish / Family Cornerstones, Inc. (TN)

  • Knox County Schools Parents as Teachers (TN)

  • Healthier Beginnings Parents as First Teachers (TN)

  • Lumin Education Parents As Teachers/ Lumin East Dallas Community Schools (TX)

  • Schulenburg/Weimar Area Parents As Teachers (TX)

  • Family Compass Growing as Parents (TX)

  • Bachman Lake Community School (TX)

  • Amarillo Independent School District/Parents as Teachers (TX)

  • Northwest Independent School District Family Involvement Program/Parents as Teachers (TX)

  • Family Outreach of East Dallas (TX)

  • Family Care Connection Parents as Teachers Program (TX)

  • The Learning Center for Families (UT)

  • Housing Opportunities, Inc. (UT)

  • Prevent Child Abuse Utah/CBCAP - DCES Utah (UT)

  • St. James Family Center - Parents as Teachers (WA)

  • First Step Family Support Center (WA)

  • Family & Childcare Resources of Northeast Wisconsin (WI)

  • Howe Community Resource Center Parents as Teachers (WI)

  • Rainelle Medical Center (WV)

  • Preston County Caring Council, Inc./Preston-Taylor Parents as Teachers (WV)

  • The Community Crossing (WV)

  • Cornerstone Family Interventions, Inc. (WV)

Parents as Teachers 2018 international conference surpasses all previous attendance records

More than 1,300 propel symposium to top figures at Arizona resort

The 2018 Parents as Teachers International Conference, held Oct. 8 – 11, surpassed all previously held attendance records, with more than 1,300 early child development professionals converging on the beautiful and spacious Arizona Grand Resort & Spa in Phoenix for the four day symposium.

Parents as Teachers President and CEO Constance Gully said the conferences continue to garner broad appeal from leading professionals committed to early child development, safety, health and well-being of children and families. She said this year’s turnout attest to the willingness of so many to help improve the lives of our most vulnerable children and families.

This year’s conference offered 80 workshops focusing on: diversity, equity, and inclusion; exploring new data-driven practices; working with families facing addictions; building stronger brains; valuing the role of dad; cultural competency in home visiting; engaging Latino families; as always, conversations about federal and state advocacy efforts.

“Our primary objective is to provide a forum for professional development, camaraderie, and educational enrichment,” said Gully, adding, “everywhere you went throughout the resort grounds, you saw people going in and out of workshops, panel discussions and focus groups, visiting the exhibit emporium and enjoying the great networking.”

Parents as Teachers conferences bring together non-profit, private and public leaders to collaborate, learn, build and nurture relationships. Gully said the YOUnited theme served as a springboard for Parents as Teachers professionals and others to explore effective ways to elevate the early childhood education home visiting field.

The conference’s success is directly linked to the sponsors and supporters committed to expanding the impact of home visiting on families and communities. “None of this would be possible without their ongoing financial support,” Gully said.

For three consecutive years, Centene Corp. has been the banner sponsor. Other major supporters included: W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Edward Jones, Bezos Family Foundation, Athena, R-B-O Logistix, Moneta Group, Jean & Mary Roy Family Foundation, and Twiga Foundation.

“And I’d like to personally thank our board chair emeritus Dave Morley and his wife, Cheryl, for their underwriting support, and our current board chair Patricia Kempthorne for her leadership and support.”

The conference was highlighted by several awards ceremonies. There were 75 Milestone recipients. Arizona State Sen. Kate Brophy-McGee received the coveted Jack Tweedie Human Services and Early Learning Award. The Child and Family Resources, Building Bright Futures PAT Home Visitation Programs received the Losos Award for Excellence. The Parenting Center of Lexington One, Lexington, SC, received the Losos Award for Innovation.

Parent Educator of the Year awards were given to Maria Arroyo, Parenting Center of Lexington One, Lexington, SC; Cindy Boger, Parents as Teachers of Catawba County Hickory Public Schools, Hickory, NC; and Kristina Gorshe, Catholic Charities Diocese of Pueblo, Pueblo, CO. One hundred Blue Ribbon Affiliates were recognized for delivering the highest quality of services to children and families.

Arizona State Sen. Kate Brophy-McGee (center) accepts the Jack Tweedie Human Services and Early Learning Award from Patricia Kempthorne, (left) board chair of Parents as Teachers National Center; and Constance Gully, PAT President, and CEO, during the annual international conference at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa.  Photos by Harley Bonham.

Arizona State Sen. Kate Brophy-McGee (center) accepts the Jack Tweedie Human Services and Early Learning Award from Patricia Kempthorne, (left) board chair of Parents as Teachers National Center; and Constance Gully, PAT President, and CEO, during the annual international conference at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa.

Photos by Harley Bonham.

Winners of the Parent Educator of Year awards pose with PAT board members and staff at the 2018 international conference in Phoenix, AZ. From left are: P.J. West, board member; Patricia Kempthorne, board chair; Constance Gully, president/CEO; Parent Educator of the Year recipients Maria Arroyo, The Parenting Center of Lexington, SC; Kristina Gorshe, Catholic Charities Diocese of Pueblo, Pueblo, CO; Cindy Boger, Parents as Teachers of Catawba County Hickory Public Schools, Hickory, NC; Kerry Caverly, VP, program and implementation support; and board members Renee Welch and Francis Vigil.

Winners of the Parent Educator of Year awards pose with PAT board members and staff at the 2018 international conference in Phoenix, AZ. From left are: P.J. West, board member; Patricia Kempthorne, board chair; Constance Gully, president/CEO; Parent Educator of the Year recipients Maria Arroyo, The Parenting Center of Lexington, SC; Kristina Gorshe, Catholic Charities Diocese of Pueblo, Pueblo, CO; Cindy Boger, Parents as Teachers of Catawba County Hickory Public Schools, Hickory, NC; Kerry Caverly, VP, program and implementation support; and board members Renee Welch and Francis Vigil.

Representatives from the Parenting Center of Lexington One, Lexington, SC, received the Losos Award for Innovation during the 2018 International Conference at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa. Photo by Harley Bonham.

Representatives from the Parenting Center of Lexington One, Lexington, SC, received the Losos Award for Innovation during the 2018 International Conference at the Arizona Grand Resort & Spa. Photo by Harley Bonham.

Representatives from the Arizona-based The Child and Family Resources, Building Bright Futures PAT Home Visitation Programs gather on stage to receive the Losos Award for Excellence. At right is PAT Board Director Francis Rushton.

Representatives from the Arizona-based The Child and Family Resources, Building Bright Futures PAT Home Visitation Programs gather on stage to receive the Losos Award for Excellence. At right is PAT Board Director Francis Rushton.

Supporters of Parents as Teachers establish a scholarship fund to commemorate parents and support cancer causes

Brother, sister team finances parent educators’ trip to Parents as Teachers National Center conferences

Oklahoma City, OK – Oct. 31, 2018 – Siblings Angela Rau and Steve Roy were raised to be socially-conscious. Their reverence for the less fortunate was influenced by the untimely death of their mother, Mary Roy (nee Corff) at age 24, and the ideals of community engagement that was subsequently reinforced in them by their grandparents and father.

Angela was only three, and Steve was eight months old when their mother died. Their father, Jean, with help from family and friends, raised them as a single father until he remarried to Shirley. Together, they had three children Christy, Edward, and Timothy. Unexpectedly, cancer struck the family again, taking Jean Roy at age 49, while he was still raising young children.

Parents’ Legacy

Now, adults, Angela and Steve have established the Jean and Mary Roy Family Scholarship of Oklahoma to support victims of cancer and groups like Parents as Teachers (PAT), an internationally-recognized early childhood development organization. PAT is an evidence-based home visiting model that promotes the optimal early development, learning and health of young children by supporting and engaging their parents and caregivers – their first teachers.

“We believe that our parents would have greatly benefited from Parents as Teachers,” Angela said, adding, “there are many circumstances that parents find themselves facing, while parenting. Having Parents as Teachers available to Oklahoma families is critical for families, parents and children.”

PAT impacts the well-being and school readiness of nearly 200,000 families and young children annually, in thousands of communities in all 50 states. The majority of families served have one or more risk factors.

Community Engagement

For the past two years, the Jean and Mary Roy Family Scholarship has provided financial support for PAT parent educators to attend annual conferences. Parent educators make personal home visits and help families with parental/child interactive skills.

This year’s scholarship recipients are Marina Montoya-Zorrilla, a 16-year PAT parent educator, who received the 2017 Outstanding Home Visitor Award from the Office of Child Abuse Prevention; and Consuelo Rozo, an eight-year PAT veteran. The two work out of the Latino Community Development Agency (LCDA), a PAT affiliate that provides services to families in south Oklahoma City. They attended PAT’s annual conference in Phoenix, AZ earlier this month.

During a get acquainted breakfast at the Arizona Grand Resort and Spa, where the 2018 Parents as Teachers International Conference was held, from left, Steve Roy, Marina Montoya-Zorrilla, Consuelo Rozo (recipients of the Jean and Mary Roy Family Scholarship), Angela Rau and Becky Moss share a moment.

During a get acquainted breakfast at the Arizona Grand Resort and Spa, where the 2018 Parents as Teachers International Conference was held, from left, Steve Roy, Marina Montoya-Zorrilla, Consuelo Rozo (recipients of the Jean and Mary Roy Family Scholarship), Angela Rau and Becky Moss share a moment.

“Marina and Consuelo have been providing home-based services the longest, and were chosen because of their long-time commitment to PAT,” said Patty DeMoraes-Huffine, director of Prevention Programs at LCDA.

LCDA administers the scholarship on behalf of PAT because it is a Blue Ribbon Affiliate, which means it is among the highest quality members of the PAT home visitation and parent education field.

“We just felt that those parent educators could benefit from the professional development and comradery they would receive at the conference. They would learn new best practices that they could share with the families they serve,” Angela said with Steve adding, “We feel like supporting programs that are effective is a wise community investment.”

Philanthropic Commitment

Steve said their family’s philanthropy is based on the conviction that a healthy, educated and community-minded society is essential to a healthy democracy. As entrepreneurs, Steve, along with Angela, own and operate an Oklahoma City industrial park on property passed through their family since the 1889 land run. Businesses surrounding or on the Corff Partnership LTD property at SE 29th street include: Balon, Cameron, Mid West Hose, M & M Supply, DXP Enterprises and TURNCO.

The two siblings are working to forge collaborative relationships with other private entities and government organizations in and around Oklahoma City. And as state and national public monies for social services programs continue to dwindle, Steve said it’s even more crucial that private organizations help provide other funding sources for public institutions.

“As a private organization, we are trying to connect with our business colleagues to establish relationships and give them a platform for their philanthropic objectives,” he said, adding, “Private funds have a direct impact on organizations without being filtered through government agencies. It’s far more important that we have the impact that dollar-for-dollar can deliver. We invest in non-profits that are doing the most, and where we can see a direct return on our money.”

As a volunteer with the American Cancer Society’s Coaches vs Cancer community outreach initiative, Steve also helps raise money to support families and victims of cancer, an undertaking that he relishes.

“It just makes you feel good when you see the smiling faces of kids and parents that you’ve been fortunate enough to help,” he said. “That makes it all worthwhile.”

Support for Parents as Teachers

Becky Moss, PAT chief development officer, echoes the sibling’s sentiments and is working with organizations and foundations to secure financial support to help PAT advance its mission.

“We are always looking to secure financial support that will help us continue developing evidence-based curriculums, conduct program evaluations, provide technical assistance, advocate for pro-family policies and train parent educators, all for the purpose of strengthening children and families,” Moss said.

For more information on giving opportunities, contact Becky Moss at 314-432-4330 ext. 1283 or by email at Becky.Moss@ParentsAsTeachers.org.

Statement on Pittsburgh Synagogue Massacre From Parents as Teachers President/CEO Constance Gully

On behalf of Parents as Teachers, our thoughts and prayers go out to the 11 worshippers killed and others wounded during the Jewish Sabbath at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh this past weekend. The Saturday massacre has rattled the faith community and all peace-loving people across the world. As we come to grips with the largest act of domestic terrorism perpetrated on people of Jewish faith on American soil, we categorically denounce anti-Semitism and all forms of racial and gender bias, and vehemently condemn these acts of violence.

As families and communities look for answers, many will seek support. Prolonged exposure and news about mass shootings can cause heightened stress, and have detrimental short- and long-term developmental and health effects on young children. Parents as Teachers is committed to working with parents and other supportive adults to help mitigate stress. We have put together some helpful tips for parents to better communicate with their children during these tumultuous times. As we continue our work to strengthen children and families, we keep the victims and the city of Pittsburgh in our thoughts and prayers.

 
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PATNC Opposes Proposed "Public Charge" Rule

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The Administration formally proposed sweeping regulations this morning that endanger the lives of immigrant families, including families with children born in the United States. The “public charge” regulation threatens to worsen hunger, poverty, and unmet health and housing needs. The proposal would make—and has already made—immigrant families afraid to seek programs that support basic needs. With about one in four children having at least one immigrant parent, this issue touches millions and is critical. As an organization that promotes the health, safety, and well-being of families with young children, Parents as Teachers National Center strongly opposes this proposed rule. The comment period is open for 60 days; we encourage you to submit comments opposing it online at www.protectingimmigrantfamilies.org.